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Job Descriptions

Marketing Director Job Description

A Marketing Director oversees the entire marketing function in an organization and is responsible for the entire organization’s public presence. This is a senior role, highly strategic in nature. The Marketing Director will typically run a team of subordinates responsible for individual brands, products or divisions, and will be expected to coordinate the team’s activities into a cohesive organization-wide marketing strategy.

The role is both internal and external.

Externally, the Marketing Director will analyse the market, understand global trends and be able to plan the organizations holistic marketing presence.

Internally, the Marketing Director will direct, lead and coach the team to understand market insights and translate them into individual plans for each brand, product or division. The Marketing Director will then collate the plans into an umbrella plan for the whole organization and ensure the team delivers against agreed targets.

This job demands a multitude of diverse skills, both technical and interpersonal, including:

  • Knowledge of best-in-class marketing practice
  • Deep insight into the marketplace
  • Excellent analytical skills
  • Understanding of every brand, product or division within the organization and how each one fits into the whole
  • Thorough knowledge and experience of performance management
  • A visionary mindset
  • Ability to think and act strategically, without becoming bogged down in day-to-day tactical concerns

 Similar Job Titles:

Marketing Vice President, Commercial Director, Head of Marketing, Chief Marketing Officer, Senior Marketing Executive

 

What Does a Marketing Director Typically Do?

A Marketing Director oversees the entire marketing function of the organization, and is responsible for global planning and target achievement. The Marketing Director is responsible for ensuring that the entire organization is aligned to and delivering what its customers and consumers need. This will include potentially coordinating diverse brands, products or divisions into a cohesive, unified whole. The specific tasks will include:

  1.   Overall market analysis
  2.   Competitor insight
  3.   Strategic planning and collation of individual department/brand/product plans
  4.   Results analysis
  5.   Budget control and management
  6.   Team management and development

Overall Market Analysis

Understanding the market will be the most crucial part of the job, defining how the market place is segmented, how it behaves and how it is currently reacting to the organization as a whole. If the analysis is done well, the consequent marketing activities of each brand, product or division in the organization will be focussed, relevant and effective.

Competitor Insight

This entails using networking, forums, thought-leader groups and other opinion-driving bodies to understand competitor strategy and probable future direction, in order to pre-empt threats and maintain a leadership position for the organization

Strategic Planning

This entails taking the insights from market analysis and defining strategies by which the organization’s global marketing effort will be guided, in addition to providing direction for each individual brand, product or division. This is important to ensure that the marketing activities all push in the same direction and are aligned.

Results Analysis

The Marketing Director will track relevant results from all marketing activities across all brands, products or divisions to ensure that targets are being reached. If so, market analysis can be re-started to determine any changes in the market. If not, corrective action can be suggested to address the issues.

Budget Setting, Control and Management

The Marketing Director will set marketing budgets and ensure that all activities stay within these constraints, and that marketing spend is tightly controlled and balanced against incremental profit generated by the marketing activities. The Marketing Director will own budgeting process annually.

  

Roles a Marketing Director typically collaborates with

 

Sales Director Chief Executive Officer Operations Director
Marketing Manager Chief Financial Officer Brand Director
Product Manager Director of Production Creative Director

  

Marketing Director Salary

The national average salary for a Marketing Director will typically be between $106,000 and $193,000 per annum in the U.S. The median is around $145,854.  

What is the Marketing Director pay difference by location?

Average salaries for a Marketing Director differ by location as follows:

City Average Salary
San Francisco, CA $182,317
Seattle, WA $159,477
Denver, CO $147,502
Austin, TX $143,447
Washington, DC $162,365
Milwaukee, WI $144,350
Boston, MA $164,334
New York, NY $175,462

  

What is the Marketing Director pay difference by experience level?

Depending on experience, pay will vary as follows:

Experience Level Average Salary
< 1 year $138,924
1–4 years $138,924
5–9 years $141,129
10–19 years $147,678
20+ years $150,231

  

Marketing Director Job Description Template

Key Responsibilities

[Company Name] is looking for a dynamic, experienced and talented Marketing Director to lead our marketing team, provide direction for the organization and its entire portfolio and drive future growth.

As the Marketing Director with [Company Name], you are at the center of the strategic direction of the marketing function, with an ability to drive and understand numbers-based research, develop coherent strategy across the entire portfolio and ensure your team delivers against target.

You and your team will be working alongside our [insert relevant departments here] teams to enhance our presence in the marketplace, drive long-term sales growth and increase our profitability.

The Marketing Directors tasks will include, but are not limited to:

  • Conduct and coordinate in-depth ongoing market research to understand marketplace dynamics
  • Analyze current marketing activities to determine effectiveness against strategic targets
  • Create the annual global marketing plan, including targets, individual portfolio strategies and budgets
  • Control and manage marketing budgets to ensure maximum return on investment
  • Lead, inspire and empower the marketing team to be best-in-class and achieve sustainable excellent results
  • Produce regular marketing reports for the Board of Directors
  • Be actively involved in the industry as a recognised thought-leader and influencer
  • Create vision, future perspective and direction for the entire organization

Required Skill Set

The Marketing Director should possess the following qualifications, skills and attributes:

  • Recognised tertiary qualification in Marketing
  • 10+ years’ experience in a Marketing Management position
  • Proven planning and analytical ability
  • Excellent communications skills on all levels
  • Financial acumen and an ability to maximise ROI
  • Strategic thinking combined with tactical nous
  • Excellent team leadership, people development and interpersonal skills
  • Ability to sustainably get the best out of a team
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Job Descriptions

Product Manager Job Description

The Product Manager is the owner of a product, product line or service. This means the Product Manager is responsible for every aspect of the product or service from inception through the complete life-cycle.

The Product Manager must ensure that the consumer of the product has the best experience every day. This is a balancing act between understanding the needs and requirements of the consumer and knowing the potential of the organization to deliver. If necessary, the Product Manager’s job is to drive improvement and change in the organization to ensure that the product is, and remains, fit-for-purpose, relevant and sellable.

Successful Product Managers are multi-skilled, analytical, organized, and dedicated to ensuring consumer satisfaction every day throughout a product’s life-cycle. This is a demanding and well-remunerated role, which also opens doors to many other roles within operations, sales, marketing, and general management within the organization. A fair amount of entrepreneurial spirit is required, meaning that many Product Managers also go on to start their own successful businesses.

Similar Job Titles:

Product Owner, Product Development Manager, Brand Manager, Product Supervisor, Product Architect, Commodity Manager

What Does a Product Manager Typically Do?

The Product Manager formulates the product’s vision, strategy and tactics, and ensures the delivery of all three in collaboration with all of the organization’s resources. This is a highly diverse and demanding role, requiring planning, analysis, holistic knowledge and people skills to ensure buy-in from all stakeholders. The role is both internal and client-facing. 

The Product Manager’s role is closely linked to that of a Brand Manager, but goes beyond it in some regards. Management of a brand entails positioning, messaging, packaging, support material, advertising and all the intangibles that talk to the consumer in the correct way about the brand. The Product Manager does all this but must also be involved in the technical aspects of the product, ensuring that the product is correctly conceived, designed, and manufactured to deliver against user needs, while remaining profitable for the organization. In addition, the Product Manager must ensure that the sales team is able to understand, demonstrate, and explain every aspect of the product in a way that will drive sales.

Strategically, the Product Manager is also responsible for the life-cycle of the product. The Product Manager must understand when to relaunch, when and what to upgrade, what differentiates the product from competitors, when to rebrand, and when to phase the product out.

Typical tasks will include, but are not limited to:

  1. Defining product vision
  2. Interviewing customers
  3. Defining product differentiation
  4. Developing the product strategy
  5. Naming and branding
  6. Planning product development
  7. Training sales staff
  8. Communication with the marketplace
  9. Managing product launches
  10. Analyzing and managing market feedback
  11. Analyzing performance to refine the strategy and tactics
  12. Relaunching, rebranding, upgrading and enhancing the product

 Defining Product Vision

Defining product vision means deciding on what the product should aim to achieve and what it should represent in the eyes of its consumers. This is a crucial function in defining the product’s differentiation towards competitor products, giving the product the best chance of long-term success.

Interviewing Customers

Interviewing customers determines the need, potential, and requirements for a product, and should inform the whole development process going forward.

Defining Product Differentiation

Defining product differentiation involves ensuring that the product, from inception, sets itself apart from competitors and has a recognizable advantage over everything else on the market.

Developing Product Strategy

In this discipline, the positioning of the product is defined to ensure that all sales support, placement, pricing and promotional activities follow a unified path.

Naming and Branding

In collaboration with the Marketing department, a Product Manager names the product and branded in such a way as to guarantee its clarity, its ability to become and remain top-of-mind and hence its long-term sellability.

Planning Product Development

The actual manufacturing of the product must be intricately planned and project-managed to ensure launch dates are feasible and the production process can be run profitably.

Training Sales Staff

Training material must be developed and Sales Teams trained to ensure the product can be explained correctly and effectively to customers and consumers.

Communication with the Marketplace

Customers and consumers must be informed of the impending launch of the product, desire and need must be created and excitement generated to ensure maximum initial pipelining sales to customers and pull-through to consumers.

Managing Product Launches

The actual launch of a product must be managed so as to create maximum impact, generating instant awareness and usage.

Analyzing and managing market feedback

Tracking systems and metrics must be developed to completely understand feedback from the marketplace, allowing instant corrective action if required.

Analyzing performance to refine the strategy and tactics

Similarly, the metrics should be regularly monitored on an ongoing basis to identify issues, opportunities and any changes in market behaviour.

Relaunching, rebranding, upgrading and enhancing the product

Periodically, and determined by ongoing product performance, the product should be relaunched, rebranded, upgraded, or enhanced to ensure its long-term competitiveness and differentiation versus competitors.

Roles a Product Manager Typically Collaborates With

 A Product Manager will work together with the following positions:

Associated Roles
Marketing Manager Brand Manager Brand Ambassador
Sales Manager Account Executive Account Manager
Business Development Manager Creative Director Finance Manager
Project Manager Operations Manager Production Manager

Product Manager Salary

The national average salary for a Product Manager will typically be between $83,000 and $144,000 per annum in the U.S. The median is around $110,982.

What is the Product Manager Pay Difference by Location?

Average salaries for a Product Manager differ by location as follows:

City Average Salary
San Francisco, CA $138,728
Seattle, WA $121,348
Denver, CO $112,236
Austin, TX $109,151
Washington, DC $123,545
Milwaukee, WI $109,838
Boston, MA $125,043
New York, NY $133,511

 

What is the Product Manager Pay Difference by Experience Level?

Depending on experience, pay will vary as follows:

Experience Level Average Salary
< 1 year $107,248
1–4 years $108,786
5–9 years $113,575
10–19 years $115,391
20+ years $115,391

 

Product Manager Job Description Template

[Company Name] is looking for a dynamic, experienced and talented Product Manager to ensure our products deliver sustainable value to our customers and the company throughout their lifecycle.

As a Product Manager with [Company Name], you will manage designated products from cradle to grave, and be responsible for every aspect of their market performance. You will analyze market intelligence, plan product initiatives, execute with excellence and drive the products’ agenda both internally and externally. 

You’ll be working alongside our [insert relevant departments here] teams to position your products, drive long-term sales growth and increase our profitability.

 

The Product Manager will be responsible for:

  • Ownership of defined products’ complete life-cycle
  • Analysis of the market to identify quantifiable new product opportunities
  • Definition of product vision, strategy, differentiation and GTM approach
  • Leadership and coordination of new product development
  • Training of internal stakeholders on product features and benefits
  • Planning and implementation of product launches
  • Definition and implementation of ongoing product strategy and tactics
  • Performance management of products, including forecasting
  • Planning and implementation of relaunches, rebrands, enhancements and upgrades as required
  • Collaboration with all internal and external stakeholders to ensure maximum product longevity, success and profitability

 Required Skill Set

The Product Manager should possess the following qualifications, skills and attributes:

  • Bachelor’s degree in Product Management
  • 5+ years’ experience in a Product Management position
  • Excellent analytical and planning skills
  • Ability to communicate effectively with all internal and external stakeholders
  • Financial management experience and a focus on profitability
  • Strategic mindset with a hands-on tactical understanding
  • Customer- and consumer-centricity
  • Ability to collaborate with multiple internal and external stakeholders to ensure success
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Job Descriptions

Business Development Manager Job Description

A Business Development Manager’s primary aim is to find potential business opportunities. What form this takes would depend on the precise nature of the company. The task will include exploring the identification of new markets, new alliances, new ways of targeting established markets, and new offers of goods or services to better serve the needs of existing markets. The Business Development Manager will use these resources to bring in more sales.

Similar Job Titles:

Development Director, Director of Business Development, Sales and Business Development, senior business development manager, marketing and business development manager

What Does a Business Development Manager Usually Do?

By using a variety of resources, such as attending meetings and networking, taking stands at exhibits and conferences, cold calling, and responding to incoming leads, a Business Development Manager will be expected to meet company goals and objectives. It is also expected that partner opportunities to cross and upsell services will be found.

Below is a list of what a Business Development Manager typically performs on a day-to-day basis:

  1. Generate leads and cold calling prospective customers
  2. Develop opportunities in target markets with support of marketing
  3. Nurture and develop relationships with key customer accounts
  4. Attend face-to-face meetings with clients
  5. Provide specialist advice on the products/services that the company is selling

Generate leads and cold calling prospective customers

Business Development Managers are in charge of the development of business solutions. The primary aim is to create more income for the organization. They’ll handle customer accounts and come up with new ideas for sales. This entails new tactics for sales, pitches for sales and business plans.

Develop opportunities in target markets

A crucial part of this job description is strategic planning, as it is the responsibility of the company developer to build the pipeline of new business coming in. This requires a thorough knowledge of the market, the solutions/services the company can provide, and of the company’s competitors.

Nurture and develop relationships with key customer accounts

Business growth, rather than just well-timed networking, is the creation of long-term value from clients, markets, and relationships for a company. A critical aspect of business growth is partnership management. For development, all companies rely heavily on all their stakeholders (internal and external). Business Development Managers are one of the few individuals who can, and should, step back to see all the moving parts of the organization as a relationship manager.

Attend face-to-face meetings with clients

Business Development Managers may be expected to travel with face-to-face customer meetings being key to relationship building, although the extent to which this is the case will depend on where the company is based. If the employer is based in New York, Business Development Managers might discover that most of the meetings are nearby. But if the employer is located in other states abroad, it might be expected to travel a considerable amount.

Provide specialist advice on products/services

Business Development Managers will be helping consumers not only make marketing decisions, but also business decisions. They should have a good understanding of general business plans, leaders’ concerns and challenges, consumer acquisition and retention, and the financial indicators that matter to managers. They have to be seen as a business advisor who can support the customer with the services provided by your organization to solve business problems.

Roles a Business Development Manager Typically Collaborates With

Depending on the company’s structure, a Business Development Manager may work closely with a variety of distinct functions. The most popular ones here are:

Roles Business Development Managers Collaborate With
Customer Service Marketing Team Technical Manager
Product Development Marketing Manager Strategic Manager
Sales Representative Sales Manager Graphic Designer

Business Development Manager Salary

The average annual salary is around $73,000 for a Business Development Manager in the United States.

Depending on the experience, the skillset, and the business, a Business Development Manager’s annual salary can range between $45,000 and $123,000.

What is the Business Development Manager Pay Difference by Location?

Here’s how the yearly salary of a typical Business Development Manager varies in major U.S. cities:

City Average Annual Salary
San Francisco, CA $94,848
Seattle, WA $80,584
Denver, CO $74,197
Austin, TX $67,498
Washington, DC $77,063
Milwaukee, WI $69,558
Boston, MA $79,619
New York, NY $79,744

What is the Business Development Manager Pay Difference by Experience?

The expertise level also influences the salary of a Business Development Manager. Here’s a table of average salaries by experience level of a Business Development Manager:

Years of Experience Average Annual Salary
< 1  $52,000
1–4  $62,000
5–9 $77,000
10–19  $87,000
20+ $93,000

Business Development Manager Job Description Template

[Company Name] is looking for a professional, creative and persuasive Business Development Manager to join our team. Your role will be to help us develop, expand on and sustain our customer relationships.

The Business Development Manager’s primary function is to promote new customers by networking, cold calling, advertisement, or other means of generating interest from prospective customers. The Business Development Manager must then prepare convincing approaches and pitches to encourage potential customers to do business with the company. The Business Development Manager must establish a partnership with new customers, set sales goals, and provide help that will strengthen the relationship continuously.

Business Development Manager Responsibilities:

  • Push new and emerging development in existing business segments in terms of sales.
  • Create, develop, and secure new business through direct prospecting and collaboration across a referral network
  • Advise on the compilation of target market penetration strategies and estimate the size of the opportunity in the short, medium, and long term
  • Inform the customer account strategies by researching existing market drivers, business strategic priorities, internal investment areas and key stakeholders
  • Push the product lifecycle from strategic planning to tactical activities
  • Bring new features to market by analysing proposed product requirements and product development programs
  • Prepare return-on-investment analyses and working closely with cross-functional teams
  • Assess market competition by comparing the company’s product to competitors’ products

Business Development Manager Requirements:

  • Ability to work in a high performing, experienced interconnection team
  • Experience in developing, maintaining, and strengthening business relationships
  • Ability to work independently and manage multiple priorities concurrently
  • Able to function in complex and challenging customer environments while maintaining the ability to influence change and negotiate mutually beneficial solutions and understandings
  • Demonstrates superior communication and presentation skills
  • Solution design with the ability to clearly articulate topics within all levels of the organisation, including senior management
  • Strong organizational and time-management skills
  • Able to analyse complex data to pull out trends and create glide paths
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Account Manager Job Description

An Account Manager is an employee who works for a business and is responsible for sales and relationship management with specific customers. They retain the current relationships of the company with a customer or group of customers, so they can continue to use the company for business. Account managers act as the interface in a corporation between the customer support and the sales staff.

Similar Job Titles:

Account Executive, Account Director, Key Account Manager, Customer Account Manager

What Does an Account Manager Usually Do?

The Account Manager is used to understand the requirements of the client, to prepare how to fulfil these requirements and as a result, to generate revenue for the business.

Here’s a list of activities an Account Manager typically performs on a monthly basis:

  1. Establish and maintain a professional relationship with clients
  2. Upsell a company’s services and solutions
  3. Manage a client’s projects from beginning to end
  4. Take a client’s requirements and assist with meeting those requirements
  5. Help management with company-wide strategic planning

Establish and maintain a professional relationship with clients

Account managers are largely responsible for cultivating customer relationships; collaborating with sales and marketing departments to plan presentations and sales pitches; designing marketing campaigns and media proposals; managing customer interactions and writing customer reports; and communicating customer agendas to other members of staff.

Upsell a company’s services and solutions

Part salesperson, part customer-service rep, an account manager is all about doing whatever it takes to get the job done. This may include selling add-on services/products to both existing and new clients. Account Managers work closely with the sales and strategic teams, meaning any potential sources of revenue should be chased. Monitoring budgets, spending and revenue, and explaining cost factors to clients are also part of the job.

Account managers will typically spend much of their time in the office, either responding to inbound requests or being optimistic about a new product feature, so that they can reach consumers.

Manage a client’s projects from beginning to end

They guarantee customer satisfaction and loyalty to the product or service of a business. As a consequence, account managers must also respond to requests from incoming customers, such as concerns about installation of the product and service, process, bugs, or other problems. They must also be vigilant and notify consumers for any product-related future changes, including redesign, upgrades, repairs, and downtime. They are the voice of the business, as a preferred touch for customers.

Assist with meeting client’s requirements

Account managers must be able to assess and appreciate each client’s activities and challenges. Although they are product experts first and foremost, in order to fulfil consumer needs, they must also know their customers well and listen attentively. This may mean proposing working with external sources to ensure that the client’s requirements are met, and that their business stays with the company.

Help management with company-wide strategic planning

Assist management with refreshing the strategic proposal at key junctures—annual planning, quarterly business reviews. Use customer/client feedback and create reports that can be sent through to the management and sales teams. They can then use this feedback, both negative and positive, to increase customer retention, satisfaction, and ultimately secure more clients for future business.

Roles an Account Manager Typically Collaborates With

An Account Manager can work closely with a number of different functions, depending on the structure of the company. The most prevalent ones here are:

Roles Account Managers Collaborate With
Sales Representative Sales Manager Customer Service
Product Development Marketing General Manager
Chief Information Officer Brand Manager Information Technology Manager

Account Manager Salary

For an Account Manager in the United States, the average annual income is about $54,000

The annual salary of an Account Manager will range between $38,000 and $83,000 depending on the experience, the skillset, and the business.

What is the Account Manager Pay Difference by Location?

Here is how an average annual Account Manager’s salary differs in major U.S. cities:

City Average Annual Salary
San Francisco, CA $72,711
Seattle, WA $60,875
Denver, CO $54,840
Austin, TX $53,039
Washington, DC $59,716
Milwaukee, WI $51,151
Boston, MA $60,984
New York, NY $64,226

What is the Account Manager Pay Difference by Experience?

The level of experience also impacts an Account Manager’s salary. Here’s a table of average Account Manager salaries by experience level:

Years of Experience Average Annual Salary
< 1  $44,000
1–4  $51,000
5–9 $60,000
10–19  $63,000
20+ $64,000

Account Manager Job Description Template

[Company Name] is seeking a skilled, innovative Account Manager to join our team in order to help us develop, build upon, and maintain our client relationships.

As an Account Manager at [Company], your goal is to keep clients or accounts as long as possible. Account managers may be in charge of finding new business, be assigned prospects, given accounts, or a combination thereof. Project management, strategic planning, sales support, product design, service application, logistics and marketing may be involved in the activities. With the objective of growing brand recognition, improving customer engagement, and driving sales and conversions, you will work alongside our [internal teams E.g. Sales Department, Strategic Department]. As well as having exceptional relationship skills, you should have good communication and leadership abilities. 

Account Manager Responsibilities:

  • Generate sales for a portfolio of accounts and reach the company’s sales target
  • Identify potential revenue opportunities in current accounts by up-selling and cross-selling to maintain a customer-account manager partnership.
  • Manage and solve conflicts with clients. 
  • Interact and collaborate in other divisions with the sales team and other staff members working on the same account.
  • Establish budgets with the client and company
  • Meet time deadlines for accounts

Account Manager Requirements:

  • Account Management Experience
  • Client-Focused Solutions Experience
  • Project Management Skills
  • Ability to Communicate Client Needs with Staff
  • Talent for Influencing Client Management
  • Ability to Manage Multiple Projects and Relationships Simultaneously
  • Negotiation Skills
  • Listening Skills
  • Communication Skills
  • Presentation Skills
  • Time Management Skills
  • BA/BS Degree

 

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Marketing Manager Job Description

A Marketing Manager runs the marketing activities of a brand, product, or division in a company, focusing on the day-to-day tactical planning and implementation of the marketing strategy. This may include the Four P’s (Product, Price, Positioning, and Promotion), customer identification, advertising, promotional activities, and other initiatives to bring the product or service to market successfully. 

Whether the organization delivers products or services, marketing forms the link between the organization and its marketplace, meaning that the Marketing Manager must have a deep understanding of both sides of the equation. 

The Marketing Manager must fully grasp how the organization works to produce and prepare its output. This encompasses:

  • Product design
  • Material sourcing
  • Production
  • Scheduling and capacity
  • Testing and quality control
  • Sales
  • Business development
  • Logistics
  • Customer service

The Marketing Manager also needs to have unparalleled knowledge of the customers and consumers, including how they behave, where they can be found, what they are looking for, how much they are prepared to pay, and what quality standards they demand. 

The Marketing Manager’s function is then to make sure that the marketplace’s requirements are fed into the organization and become an integral part of the way the organization functions. The Marketing Manager becomes the voice of the customer towards the organization and vice versa.

 Similar Job Titles:

Marketing Coordinator, Marketing Supervisor, Marketing Team Leader, Marketing Specialist,

 

What Does a Marketing Manager Typically Do?

A Marketing Manager analyses the marketplace and creates strategic plans and tactical actions to drive sales of the product or service. The Marketing Manager is responsible for ensuring that the organization is aligned to and delivering what its customers and consumers need. The specific tasks will include:

  1. Market analysis
  2. Strategic planning
  3. Tactical implementation
  4. Results analysis
  5. Budget control and management

Market Analysis

Understanding the market will be the most crucial part of the job, by defining how the market place is segmented, how it behaves, and how it is currently reacting to the product or service on offer. If the analysis is done well, the consequent marketing activities will be focussed, relevant, and effective.

Strategic Planning

Strategic Planning involves taking the insights from market analysis and defining the strategies which will guide the marketing effort. This process is important to ensure that the marketing activities all push in the same direction and are aligned.

Tactical Implementation

Tactical Implementation encompasses all the actual marketing activities for the product or service, such as: 

  1. Promotions
  2. Pricing modeling and rollout
  3. Sales support material development
  4. Packaging design and production

It is the Marketing Manager’s responsibility to make sure all activities are strategically aligned. If this is the case, they stand a good chance of achieving the desired effect.

Results Analysis

The Marketing Manager will track relevant results from all marketing activities to ensure that targets are being reached. If so, market analysis can be re-started to determine any changes in the market. If not, corrective action can be implemented to address the issues.

Budget Control and Management

The Marketing Manager will ensure that all activities stay within prescribed budgets and that marketing spend is tightly controlled and balanced against incremental profit generated by the marketing activities. The Marketing Manager will also, ideally, be involved in the budgeting process annually.

 

Roles a Marketing Manager Typically Collaborates With

 A Marketing Manager will regularly collaborate with the following positions:

Sales Manager Account Executive Brand Ambassador
Account Manager Brand Manager Finance Manager
Product Manager Business Development Manager Creative Director
Project Manager Operations Manager  

 Marketing Manager Salary

The national average salary for a Marketing Manager will typically be between $80,000 and $142,000 per annum in the U.S. The median is around $106,168.  

What Is the Marketing Manager Pay Difference by Location?

Average salaries for a Marketing Manager differ by location as follows:

City Average Salary
San Francisco, CA $132,709
Seattle, WA $116,084
Denver, CO $107,367
Austin, TX $104,416
Washington, DC $118,186
Milwaukee, WI $105,073
Boston, MA $119,619
New York, NY $127,720

  

What is the Marketing Manager Pay Difference by Experience Level?

Depending on experience, pay will vary as follows:

Experience Level Average Salary
< 1 year $102,704
1–4 years $103,112
5–9 years $105,149
10–19 years $109,539
20+ years $110,944

 

Marketing Manager Job Description Template

[Company Name] is looking for a dynamic, experienced, and talented Marketing Manager to join our team and enhance the marketing function throughout the organization and into the marketplace.

As the Marketing Manager with [Company Name], you are a key element in both the strategic direction and the tactical implementation of the marketing function, with an ability to drive and understand numbers-based research, develop a coherent strategy, and translate it into implementable, hands-on action plans.

You’ll be working alongside our [insert relevant departments here] teams to enhance our presence in the marketplace, drive long-term sales growth, and increase our profitability.

The Marketing Manager will be expected to:

  • Conduct and coordinate in-depth ongoing market research to understand marketplace dynamics
  • Analyze current marketing activities to determine effectiveness against strategic targets, using agreed metrics
  • Control and manage marketing budgets to ensure maximum return on investment
  • Develop strategic marketing plans based on research in collaboration with brand management, business development management, finance management, and operations management
  • Devise strategically aligned action plans to achieve agreed targets
  • Produce regular marketing reports for management and the organization
  • Ensure production of all relevant marketing materials, brochures, sales support, PR, and ER publications
  • Oversee all external marketing activities at which the organization is presented
  • Coordinate and drive ongoing consumer- and customer-level communication
  • Work closely with the entire organization to improve customer experience, boost sales, and maximize profit

Required Skill Set

The Marketing Manager should possess the following qualifications, skills, and attributes:

  • Recognized tertiary qualification in Marketing
  • 5+ years’ experience in a Marketing position
  • Proven planning and analytical ability
  • Excellent communications skills on all levels
  • Financial acumen and an ability to maximise ROI
  • Strategic thinking combined with tactical nous
  • Focus on customer and consumer wishes
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Job Descriptions

Graphic Designer Job Description

Graphic designers combine their creativity and artistic talent with their mastery of technologies to create text and images for a variety of clients – from the designing of one small logo to the creation of an entire branding package.

Similar Job Titles:

Digital Designer, Web Designer, UX Designer, Social Media Designer

What Does a Graphic Designer Usually Do?

Graphic Designers design graphics for  media products, such as magazines, labels, advertising, and signage.

Here’s a list of activities a Graphic Designer typically performs:

  1. Meets with clients or the art director to determine the scope of a project
  2. Expands on the company’s visual identity
  3. Engages in the Complete Artistic Process
  4. Presents design concepts to clients or art directors
  5. Incorporates changes recommended by clients or art directors into final designs
  6. Reviews designs for errors before printing or publishing them

Meeting With Clients To Determine Project Scope

A Graphic Designer, along with different specialists in the organization, conceptualizes and builds up the visual components that will ultimately fit the client’s needs. This involves everything from defining the goals and concepts to determining what the client has visualized in their mind. 

Aside from assembling a strategy for the design work, Graphic Design specialists also plan out seasonal makeovers – for example, holiday rebranding and summer/winter designs.

Expanding on the Company’s Identity

When it comes to branding, continuity is paramount. A Graphic Designer must understand the brand’s desires and needs and create the visual identity of the brand accordingly. 

This encompasses everything from the choice of graphic design colors and photographs to the visual tone that the brand uses. 

Engaging in the Complete Artistic Process

A Graphic Designer should collaborate closely with all members of the branding and copywriting team, as they are someone who determines the brand personality and ensures the consistency of the deliverables. 

In the brief and drafts timeline, a Graphic Designer will give constant feedback to the Art Director and client, ultimately establishing the visual identity of the brand. 

Present Design Concepts to Clients

Graphic Design is important for marketing and selling products, and it is a critical component of brochures and logos. Graphic Designers often work closely with people in advertising and promotions, public relations, and marketing.

This will also involve researching the current and predicted design trends, presenting the research to the client for feedback, and refining the strategy further if need be. 

Incorporate Changes Into Final Design

Frequently, designers specialize in a particular category or type of client. For example, some designers create the graphics used on product packaging, and others may work on the visual designs used on book jackets. This provides fresh eyes to a client’s goal. 

There are times a client may go against a Graphic Designer’s initial design. This is when Graphic Designers should gather the data, provide valuable insights regarding the design and ultimately incorporate the client’s changes into the final design. This can involve putting together meetings and brainstorming further with the Art Director and client. 

Review Designs Before Publishing

As the visual perception of the brand, Graphic Designers need to ensure that the final design represents the product accurately. This means there will be multiple reviews and edits with the design team before the design is ready to capture the targeted audience. 

Roles a Graphic Designer Typically Collaborates With

A Graphic Designer may work closely with a variety of distinct positions depending on the nature of the business. The most common ones are:

Roles Graphic Designers Collaborate With
Art Directors Copywriters Photographers
Social Media Manager Market Research Executive Creative Director
Marketing Manager Brand Manager Market Research Analyst 

Graphic Designer Salary

The average annual salary for a Graphic Designer in the United States is around $55,000. 

Depending on the range of skills, experience, and organization, a Graphic Designer’s yearly compensation can be in the range of $39,000 and $73,000.

What Is the Graphic Designer Pay Difference by Location?

Here is how an average annual Computer Graphic Design salary differs in major U.S. cities:

City Average Annual Salary
San Francisco, CA $69,800
Seattle, WA $61,100
Denver, CO $56,500
Austin, TX $54,900
Washington, DC $62,200
Milwaukee, WI $55,300
Boston, MA $62,900
New York, NY $67,200

What Is the Graphic Design Pay Difference by Experience?

A Graphic Designer’s compensation can vary depending on the level of experience. Below is a table of the average pay rates by experience level for a Graphic Designer:

Years of Experience Average Annual Salary
< 1  $39,000
1–4  $43,000
5–9 $49,000
10–19  $51,000
20+ $52,000

Graphic Designer Job Description Template

[Company Name] is searching for a skilled, experienced, and inventive Graphic Designer to join our group and assist us with developing the brand’s visual identity. 

As a Graphics Designer at [Company], you will be responsible for interpreting the brand and marketing needs of clients to drive sales/revenue and convey a certain message to consumers.

Some of the internal departments you’ll be working closely with include [insert departments—e.g., Creative Director, Photography, Design] to bring the brief and concept to life based on the client’s needs and vision. To thrive, you’ll need to be self-motivated, have excellent communication skills, and show keen attention to detail. 

Graphics Designer Responsibilities

  • Design and develop product brand identity
  • Direct marketing design projects
  • Collaborate with multiple departments
  • Create and assemble images and graphics to produce designs for websites, print media, product design, displays and productions

Graphics Designer Requirements

  • 1–3 years of experience as a Graphic Designer (or 3+ years of experience in a similar role)
  • Be creative, adaptable to trends and conceptualise original ideas
  • Have a strong, well-rounded portfolio that showcases your individual design aesthetic
  • Good communication skills to accurately convey your concepts to clients and team members
  • Be a skilled user of design software such as Adobe Illustrator, Photoshop, and InDesign
  • Mindful of client’s needs and the time and costs associated with what you will be delivering
  • Have an active interest in art/design and passionate about the work you deliver
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Does an Unusual Job Title Hurt Your Chances of Finding Work?

If you’ve grown tired of your old job and you’re looking to make a change, you’ll likely go through various job postings via different platforms. When applying for a new job position, in some cases you’ll have to choose a specific title from a drop-down menu. With options like Director, Manager, Assistant, and Coordinator, you might be wondering—Why is my current job title not on the list?

It isn’t surprising if you can’t find your current job title in almost any job postings. Plenty of companies use unusual job titles to brand themselves as trendy and different. The big question is—Does having an uncommon title affect your chances of finding a new job?

Various experts have different options on the matter. In this article, we’re going to take a look at some of the perspectives and help you use them to your advantage.

Be Honest and Clarify What Your Job Is

When it comes to finding the right people for a company, recruiters search for specific keywords and job titles. If your title is unusual, chances are that you’ll never come up in the search results for businesses you’d like to work for. The problem is that you can’t lie about your job title, because your potential new employer will find out.

While experts advise that you be honest about your job title, they also suggest you add a more common one in brackets. If your title is Daylight Specialist, you can add what your job role is better known as in the industry, such as curtain designer or glass manufacturer. 

Elaborate on Your Responsibilities

You need to establish the difference between what your job role and title are. While you may be named an Expert, Manager, Director, or Vice President, it doesn’t explain your role fully to a potential employer without context. You should present your job title as is and elaborate on what your responsibilities within the company are. 

Who and what do you work with? Is your job to deal with clients or customers? Do you manage particular business processes or is your job to assist with them? Explain your role as best as you can, and you’ll have better chances of landing that new job.

Embrace the Title You Have and Use It to Your Advantage

If you’ve got a job title such as a Brand Warrior or Digital Prophet, some experts believe that you should embrace it and let its creativity be one of the aspects that catch the eye of a potential employer. Aside from adding common titles that are similar next to it so that companies can find you, write a unique cover letter that explains what your unusual job title means. 

If you want to read more, check out some of our other articles about various job-related issues, such as:

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7 Small Changes That Can Help You Love Your Job

Plenty of people feel like they’re stuck doing jobs that they aren’t happy with. Many of them are stressed because of the responsibilities that their role carries. Others love the work but feel like they don’t belong in their workplace. 

There’s a variety of factors that can make you unsatisfied with your job. If you don’t want to switch companies or you’re not in the position to do so, here are some small changes that you can apply to help you start loving your current job more:

  1. Don’t obsess over negatives
  2. Try working from home
  3. Determine what you’re good at
  4. Find out what’s bothering you
  5. Discuss with your boss
  6. Change your work hours
  7. Make a friend at work

Don’t Obsess Over Negatives

Don’t spend your time dwelling on what stresses you about your work. Negative thoughts are like a black hole—the more you think, the worse you’re going to feel. If you find yourself thinking about a negative event, let it replay in your mind, identify what you can learn from it, and move on.

Try Working From Home

Plenty of companies have determined that allowing their employees to work from home one day a week boosts their productivity and makes them enjoy the job more. It gives employees more autonomy while enabling them to connect with their co-workers during the rest of the workweek. Talk to your manager and see if this can be an option for you.

Determine What You’re Good At

It’s common for people to give more weight to the negative events in their lives and take the good ones for granted. You should try spending a few minutes at the end of every week to identify what you’re good at. Focus on your accomplishments, and they might make you feel better about your job and yourself.

Find Out What’s Bothering You

If your job is stressing you out, it would be a good idea to stop and think about what the problem is. Instead of generalizing the issue, try to identify particular culprits. This way, you can come up with strategies on how to deal with them. Some can be avoided, while others might require making certain changes.

Talk to Your Boss

Is your boss a lenient and trustworthy guy that you feel like you can talk to? If you’re having an issue with your job, ask them for a meeting and see if you can find a resolution together. Keep in mind that you have to present them with concrete issues and provide suggestions on how you would approach them. 

Change Your Work Hours

See if changing your daily work routine can affect the way you feel about your job. Maybe a bit more sleep or a chance to avoid traffic when going to work can make a difference. If you can start working earlier and have more time to go for a walk or to the gym after work, your daily routine can make you be more satisfied with your job.

Make a Friend

Are there colleagues at work that could be your friends? It’s beneficial to have someone in the workplace that you can talk to and share your issues and thoughts with. They can help you lighten the mood and look at the job from a different perspective. It’s easier to face different work hurdles with someone you can trust.

While these changes might be relatively small, they can affect your attitude towards your job in various ways. Try applying them and see if you can start loving your job instead of feeling like it’s a burden.

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5 Lucrative Occupations for People With Associate Degrees

Due to student loan debts growing higher than ever, plenty of people have determined that it’s better to get an associate degree than to attend an expensive four-year program for becoming a B.A. 

Looking at the job market, we can determine that this decision makes sense because it’s supported by plenty of companies. You can find a variety of jobs that require an associate degree and pay extremely well. Here are some of the most lucrative occupations that you should consider if you don’t want to invest in four-year studies:

  1. Air traffic controller
  2. Web developer
  3. Dental hygienist
  4. Computer network specialist
  5. Radiologic technologist

Air Traffic Controller

Working as an Air Traffic Controller is one of the best-paid associate degree jobs you can find. Your job will be to ensure the safety of each flight by directing air traffic. You will be responsible for providing pilots with instructions during landing and takeoff, and making sure that they’re informed about weather conditions constantly during the flight. You will also manage any ground traffic happening around runways. 

Web Developer

Instead of creating separate teams for client-side and server-side tasks, more and more companies are hiring full-stack web developers for handling all aspects of websites and applications. This includes handling the foundation via the back end and creating the perfect user experience via the front end. When it comes to this position, most companies are more interested in what you can do than what kind of degree you’ve got.

Dental Hygienist

The job of a dental hygienist is to check for oral health conditions, perform basic dental cleaning, and provide different types of preventive healthcare. While you only need an associate degree for this position, you will have to take up about three years of studies and training. A dental hygienist needs to be a licensed practitioner in a particular state, but it’s worth it considering that you’ll be doing one of the best-paid jobs with your associate degree.

Computer Network Specialist

Working as a computer networking specialist, your job will be to establish and maintain a company’s wide and local computer networks. You’ll set up operating systems, install and update software, and maintain crucial security practices. When it comes to career advancement, computer network specialists usually become network security professionals or computer network architects. While some people get bachelor degrees to advance, experience and proficiency are generally much more important factors for being promoted to higher-ranking positions.

Radiologic Technologist

A radiologic technologist—or radiographer—is one of the best-paid job positions in the healthcare industry. When signing up for this position, you will be trained to handle X-rays to diagnose patients. Your responsibilities will most likely be to help patients prepare for the procedure and work with the X-ray imaging equipment. You might also be assigned to analyze the results and maintain patient records.

While you can get hired for these jobs with an associate degree, keep in mind that they’re not easy to do. They all require a certain amount of technical proficiency and the ability to remain highly focused throughout the workday. For some of them, you’ll need to take up additional studies and training.

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How to Handle a Career Setback

While facing a career setback can be overwhelming, it’s neither unexpected nor is it the end of the world. Most people’s careers go through such a phase at least once. 

When it comes to career setbacks, they come in various forms. You can be passed over for a promotion you’ve been waiting for, an important project that you’re responsible for can go awry, or you could get fired from your dream job because of an unexpected situation in the company. It’s normal to feel devastated when that happens, but it’s important to remind yourself that your career isn’t over and that there’s plenty of actions you can take to get it back on track. 

If you’re unsure what to do when your career goes astray, here are a couple of professional pieces of advice.

Face the Situation

In a situation such as a career setback, it’s crucial to remember that denial is your enemy. You need to acknowledge the problem to be able to work on it. It’s okay to find a trustworthy friend or co-worker that can help you get back on your feet, but it’s your career and you’re the one that has to put it back on track.

Take a look at the situation and try to determine what went wrong objectively. Did the incident occur because of a flaw in your performance or did the company decide to take a new direction where you no longer fit in? If you can assess the setback and identify your strengths and weaknesses, you have a foundation for starting anew and not repeating old mistakes.

Build a New Plan

A career setback can be the perfect time for self-reflection and reassessment. If you want to get back on your feet, you mustn’t stop learning and working on your skills. Devote your time to online courses, webinars, and other sources of information that can keep you up to date with what you need to be able to grow and find new opportunities.

Chances are that the career you’ve gotten used to has been keeping you in the comfort zone. There are often multiple ways for you to restart your career that you might not be aware of right away. Spend some time discovering them and building a new plan.

Take Action

When you feel you’re ready, you should start researching potential career opportunities. You can develop your personal brand, reach out to recruitment agencies to help you with your job search, or contact companies that you’re interested in working for directly. 

When it comes to companies, you should research each one, figure out what they’re looking for, and try to build networks where you can find the right people that can help you land the job.

It’s crucial that you don’t see your career setback as a disaster but as a bump along the way. Keep reminding yourself that the situation you’re in is temporary and don’t stop looking for new opportunities.

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